Otolaryngology

David Kanagy, M.D.

Graduate Education Information

Residency: Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, IL

Medical School: Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, OH

Board Certification Information

Certification Board: American Board of Otolaryngology

Certification: Otolaryngology

 

Kimberly Anthony, Au.D.

Education:

Kent State University, Kent, OH 

  • Master of Arts in Audiology
  • Bachelor of Science in Speech Pathology & Audiology

A. T. Still University of Health Sciences, Messa, AZ

  • Doctor of Audiology

Memberships & Licensure

  • Ohio State Licensure in Audiology
  • Member of the American Academy of Audiology
  • Member of the Ohio Academy of Audiology

To learn more about Audiology and hearing loss, please click here to read our brochure.

 

Contact Information

Alliance Community Medical Foundation, LLC
270 E. State St., Suite 245
Alliance, OH 44601
(330) 596-6520
fax: 330-596-6520

Allergy Department Hours

Monday - 8:00AM - 4:45PM
Tuesday - CLOSED
Wednesday - 8:00AM - 4:45PM
Thursday - 1:00PM - 4:45PM
Friday - 8:00AM - 11:45AM
**Please call for a consultation

Otolaryngology (pronounced oh/toe/lair/in/goll/oh/jee) is the oldest medical specialty in the United States. Otolaryngologists are physicians trained in the medical and surgical management and treatment of patients with diseases and disorders of the ear, nose, throat (ENT), and related structures of the head and neck. They are commonly referred to as ENT physicians.

What do otolaryngologists treat?
Otolaryngologists diagnose and manage diseases of the ears, nose, sinuses, larynx (voice box), mouth, and throat, as well as structures of the neck and face.

The ears—Hearing loss affects one in ten North Americans. The unique domain of otolaryngologists is the treatment of ear disorders. They are trained in both the medical and surgical treatment of hearing loss, ear infections, balance disorders, ear noise (tinnitus), and some cranial nerve disorders. Otolaryngologists also manage congenital (birth) disorders of the outer and inner ear.

The nose—About 35 million people develop chronic sinusitis each year, making it one of the most common health complaints in America. Care of the nasal cavity and sinuses is one of the primary skills of otolaryngologists. Problems in the nasal area include allergies, smell disorders, polyps, and nasal obstruction due to a deviated septum. Otolaryngologists can also correct the appearance of the nose (rhinoplasty surgery).

The throat Communicating (speech and singing) and eating a meal all involve this vital area. Specific to otolaryngologists is expertise in managing diseases of the throat, larynx (voice box), and the upper aero-digestive tract or esophagus, including voice and swallowing disorders.

The head and neck—This area of the body includes the important functions of sight, smell, hearing, and the appearance of the face. In the head and neck area, otolaryngologists are trained to treat infections, benign (non-cancerous) and malignant (cancerous) tumors, facial trauma, and deformities of the face. They perform both cosmetic plastic and reconstructive surgery.

What are the seven areas of expertise in the field of otolaryngology?

  • Allergy: treatment by medication, immunotherapy (allergy shots) and/or avoidance of pollen, dust, mold, food and other sensitivities that affect the ear, nose and throat.
    Treating: hay fever, seasonal and perennial rhinitis, chronic sinusitis, laryngitis, sore throat, otitis media, dizziness
  • Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery: cosmetic, functional and reconstructive surgical treatment of abnormalities of the face and neck and ear.
    Treating: deviated septum, rhinoplasty (nose), face lift, cleft palate, drooping eyelids, hair loss and other ear deformities.
  • Head and Neck: cancerous and noncancerous tumors in the head and neck (nose/sinuses, mouth, throat, voice box and upper esophagus), including the thyroid and parathyroid.
    Treating: lump in the neck or thyroid, cancer of the voice box.
  • Laryngology: disorders of the throat, including voice and swallowing problems.
    Treating: sore throat, hoarseness, swallowing disorder, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), infections and tumors.
  • Otology/Neurotology: diseases of the ear, including trauma (injury), infection, benign tumors and nerve pathway disorders, that affect hearing and balance.
    Treating: ear infection; swimmer’s ear; hearing loss; ear, face or neck pain, dizziness and ringing in the ears (tinnitus).
  • Pediatric Otolaryngology: diseases in children with special ENT problems including birth defects of the head and neck and developmental delays.
    Treating: ear infection (otitis media), tonsil and adenoid infection, airway problems, asthma and allergy/sinus disease and neck tumors.
  • Rhinology: disorders of the nose and sinuses.
    Treating: sinus disorder, nose bleed, stuffy nose, loss of smell, polyps and tumors.

Why should I see an otolaryngologist?

These specialists differ from many physicians in that they are trained in both medicine and surgery. Otolaryngologists do not need to refer patients to other physicians when ear, nose, throat or head/neck surgery is needed and, therefore, can offer the most appropriate care for each individual patient. Otolaryngologists are the most appropriate physicians to treat disorders of the ears, nose, throat and related structures of the head and neck.

*Source: American Academy of Otolaryngology- Head and Neck Surgery, www.entnet.org

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